time… and MONEY

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Rush rush….

  I feel for the youth of today.

  Sort of. 

  Things aren’t easy. 

  But they never have been, if the truth were known. 

  That whole fantasy about a Golden Age is wishful thinking. A trick our minds play upon us. One of the myriad tricks our minds play. 

  Thing is, nowadays time is becoming increasingly precious. Things more costly, money more prevalent and correspondingly less valuable. 

  In Engineering they call that entropy. Things flow in one direction, never backwards. 

  Time is money. Money, time. 

  When I dropped out of University for the last time and landed a job mopping floors in a hospital I could afford a little place of my own on two days a week of work. The rest of the week belonged to me. 

  Later, after gaining a certain amount of experience behind the wheel of a truck I could live decently on one trip a week from Calgary to Vancouver. Again, two days. 

  As a result, the Omphalos Cafe is the fruit of thirty years of scattered, wonderful, blessed reading. Almost to the exclusion of everything else. 

  Almost.

  But who has the time, never mind the inclination, these days? 

  Not that I’d wish that sort of blockheaded obsession on anyone. 

  However, that being said, I’ll tell you something which can save twenty or more years if you’re crazy enough—obsessed with truths enough—to devote your life to such seeming abstrusities. 

  It’s this:

  In any given century there are only a handful, three, maybe four or even five towering geniuses worth reading over and over again. 

  Everyone else is derivative, a follower.

  Find those few and read them over and over again. 

  Joseph Campbell (1899 to 1987, I think), the last towering genius I am aware of, read Oswald Spengler (a generation earlier) seven times. James Joyce was a contemporary of Spengler and communicated the same things through poetic art that Spengler did through his poetic philosophy. 

  That makes three.

  While others came close those three stand out, like the three brightest stars in the night sky. 

  There.

  If you truly want to have something to say worth listening to the path leads through those three. 

  Spengler, Joyce, and Campbell.

  Start with Campbell. He’s easier, and standing on the shoulders of the first two, more comprehensive. 

  But that doesn’t mean there’ll be anyone to actually listen if you follow my advice.

  Ain’t Life a bitch?

  But what else is there?